Metropolitan Police out in force for road safety: Where are the problem junctions in south London?

Wandsworth Guardian: A cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus in East Croydon on November 12 A cyclist was killed after being hit by a bus in East Croydon on November 12

A major road safety operation launched this morning that will see 2,500 police officers dedicated to making London junctions safer.

The Metropolitan Police said Operation Safeway will see 166 key junctions being policed at morning and afternoon rush hours over the next two weeks, with fixed penalty notices given to offenders.

It comes after a spate of road deaths and serious injuries sustained by cyclists, motorcylists and pedestrians in recent weeks - many of them in south London.

  • November 18: A woman was killed after being hit by a lorry in Roehampton
  • November 12: A cyclist died after after being hit by a bus near East Croydon station
  • November 9: A motorcyclist died after being hit by a lorry in Croydon
  • October 14: A cyclist was treated for minor injuries after being hit by a car in Twickenham
  • October 7: A motorcyclist hurt his back after being hit by a car in New Malden
  • October 4: A woman fractured her collar bone after being hit by a car in Wandsworth

The Met said about 650 officers will be at 60 sites today, with the number of officers and sites set to rise as the operation progresses.

Superintendent Rob Revill, from the Met's Safer Transport Command, said: "This operation will be intensive and far-reaching.

"Our aim is to reduce the appalling number of people who die or are injured on London's roads each year.

"Every road death is a needless tragedy that wreaks devastation for the victim's friends and family. Every serious injury is life-changing and distressing.

Supt Revill added officers would also be "educating the public at interactive events and talking to anyone we see acting dangerously on or about the roads."

Richard Tracey, Merton and Wandsworth's Assembly Member at City Hall, has called on Transport for London to publish borough-by-borough statistics on road accidents involving buses.

Mr Tracey called for greater transparency after City Hall Conservatives revealed nearly 2,000 people have been killed or seriously injured in bus accidents in the last five years.


HAVE YOUR SAY: What are the worst junctions in your area of south London for accidents involving cyclists and pedestrians?

What more can police, councils, or Transport for London do to make problem junctions safer?

Leave your comments below, email ooakes@london.newsquest.co.uk, or tweet @OmarOakes.


What readers are saying on Twitter:

@richmondtimes @RichmondCycling St Margarets Roundabout is pretty hairy. Lots of vehicles ignore red lights (deliberately and accidentally)

— wurensh (@wurensh) November 25, 2013

@WimbledonNews why not deploy 2,500 workers to redesign the key junctions / build segregated cycle lanes over the next few weeks?

— Colinius (@therorycat) November 25, 2013

@richmondtimes @RichmondCycling Twicks King St to Cross Deep. World's stupidest cycle lane, multiple lanes turning, bus lanes, filters.

— Narrowboat Lucy (@narrowboatlucy) November 25, 2013

@richmondtimes Chalker’s Corner is a nightmare for cyclists. @RichmondCycling

— Ben Woodhams (@benwoodhams) November 25, 2013

@wandsworthnews all over the borough.... Doesn't have to be a junction; pedestrian crossings frequently blocked by queuing motorists.

— WandsLS (@WandsLS) November 25, 2013

Readers' comments:

  • Twickenham cyclist Sandra Bradley said all cyclists should learn the Highway Code:

"Cyclists must be aware their actions can be the cause for accidents.

"Vehicle drivers are trained to drive to the Highway Code but it is not a requirement for a cyclist, why not? 

"Every day I see cyclists who have absolutely no idea how to correctly use junctions, who has the right of way?

"Apply this to roundabouts as well. Untrained cyclists are unpredictable at traffic light junctions they jump and travel against red lights.

"If cyclists do not correctly inform other road users their intentions, when indicating to turn across the traffic right or left then accidents will and do happen.

"Any cyclist using a mobile phone, wearing head phones and weaving in and out of traffic should not be under any illusion they are untouchable; they are breaking the law and they are taking huge risks and can only blame themselves for the risks they insist on taking."

Comments (18)

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9:57am Mon 25 Nov 13

DB says...

This seems a great idea to me, and I don't see why they don't do it more often. With the general standard of driving and cycling in London, I am sure the amount generated in fixed penalty tickets would far exceed the cost of the operation.

If they placed a patrol on the slipway by the zebra crossing at the junction of Grove Road and Portsmouth Road in Surbiton and fined every driver who jumped the crossing £60, they'd make literally £1,000's a day and may even encourage better driving standards as well.
This seems a great idea to me, and I don't see why they don't do it more often. With the general standard of driving and cycling in London, I am sure the amount generated in fixed penalty tickets would far exceed the cost of the operation. If they placed a patrol on the slipway by the zebra crossing at the junction of Grove Road and Portsmouth Road in Surbiton and fined every driver who jumped the crossing £60, they'd make literally £1,000's a day and may even encourage better driving standards as well. DB

10:16am Mon 25 Nov 13

fargis says...

Omar, check out the protest that will happening this Friday outside the TfL offices in London. https://www.facebook
.com/events/56875135
3179586/?source=1
Omar, check out the protest that will happening this Friday outside the TfL offices in London. https://www.facebook .com/events/56875135 3179586/?source=1 fargis

10:39am Mon 25 Nov 13

SteveC1964 says...

Fact: The Malden junction at New Malden/ A3 is the worst for collisions involving cyclists and pedestrians. Drivers don't observe the zebra crossings which is pretty challenging for the boys going to Coombe Boys School. Let's have some enforcement there please Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. Those kids sare cycling to reduce traffic congestion and have independence not, (as you seem to think), for economic reasons.

Coombe Road by New Malden station has had loads of collisions involving people on bikes. Why? Probably indisciplined drivers and illegal parking on the cycle lane.

The mini roundabout at the junction of Tudor Drive and Lathmere Lane is a hazardous junction but only because drivers on Tudor Drive don't obey the rules of the road - they don't give way to traffic from their right so they collide with people on bikes going to and from Richmond Park. Station a bobby at that junction please.
Fact: The Malden junction at New Malden/ A3 is the worst for collisions involving cyclists and pedestrians. Drivers don't observe the zebra crossings which is pretty challenging for the boys going to Coombe Boys School. Let's have some enforcement there please Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe. Those kids sare cycling to reduce traffic congestion and have independence not, (as you seem to think), for economic reasons. Coombe Road by New Malden station has had loads of collisions involving people on bikes. Why? Probably indisciplined drivers and illegal parking on the cycle lane. The mini roundabout at the junction of Tudor Drive and Lathmere Lane is a hazardous junction but only because drivers on Tudor Drive don't obey the rules of the road - they don't give way to traffic from their right so they collide with people on bikes going to and from Richmond Park. Station a bobby at that junction please. SteveC1964

11:57am Mon 25 Nov 13

Sutton53 says...

The junction of Langley Park Road and Carshalton Road is dangerous for pedestrians, car-drivers and cyclists. Cars turning right into Langley Park Road alongside B & Q have to negotiate cyclists and motor-bike riders who come alongside on the wrong side of the road facing the oncoming traffic as they (the car-driver) is stationery trying to turn right. even if you indicate a long way back your intentions. If a car-driver dares to say anything they get two-fingers a few choice swear words and threats of violence. It is worse now as the cars have to negotiate parked vehicles along the red route parking bays and beyond on certain days. (Even on the pavement)! I suppose it could be worse if I lived in Box Hill Since the Olympics every day and especially at weekends hoards of cyclists descend on the area, sometimes in groups of 10 or more, most of them trying to emulate Bradley Wiggins and Mark Cavendish! It is a nightmare for residents.
The junction of Langley Park Road and Carshalton Road is dangerous for pedestrians, car-drivers and cyclists. Cars turning right into Langley Park Road alongside B & Q have to negotiate cyclists and motor-bike riders who come alongside on the wrong side of the road facing the oncoming traffic as they (the car-driver) is stationery trying to turn right. even if you indicate a long way back your intentions. If a car-driver dares to say anything they get two-fingers a few choice swear words and threats of violence. It is worse now as the cars have to negotiate parked vehicles along the red route parking bays and beyond on certain days. (Even on the pavement)! I suppose it could be worse if I lived in Box Hill Since the Olympics every day and especially at weekends hoards of cyclists descend on the area, sometimes in groups of 10 or more, most of them trying to emulate Bradley Wiggins and Mark Cavendish! It is a nightmare for residents. Sutton53

1:22pm Mon 25 Nov 13

CyclistsPayTaxToo says...

Sutton53 wrote:
The junction of Langley Park Road and Carshalton Road is dangerous for pedestrians, car-drivers and cyclists. Cars turning right into Langley Park Road alongside B & Q have to negotiate cyclists and motor-bike riders who come alongside on the wrong side of the road facing the oncoming traffic as they (the car-driver) is stationery trying to turn right. even if you indicate a long way back your intentions. If a car-driver dares to say anything they get two-fingers a few choice swear words and threats of violence. It is worse now as the cars have to negotiate parked vehicles along the red route parking bays and beyond on certain days. (Even on the pavement)! I suppose it could be worse if I lived in Box Hill Since the Olympics every day and especially at weekends hoards of cyclists descend on the area, sometimes in groups of 10 or more, most of them trying to emulate Bradley Wiggins and Mark Cavendish! It is a nightmare for residents.
Heaven forbid someone should enjoy being out on the road in anything other than a car........ here we go again, let me save you the bother, they dont pay road tax, they are all lycra louts, they jump red lights, they ride on the pavement, they are rude, they shout naughty words at you, you cant overtake, they should take a test, get insurance blah blah blah get over it.......
[quote][p][bold]Sutton53[/bold] wrote: The junction of Langley Park Road and Carshalton Road is dangerous for pedestrians, car-drivers and cyclists. Cars turning right into Langley Park Road alongside B & Q have to negotiate cyclists and motor-bike riders who come alongside on the wrong side of the road facing the oncoming traffic as they (the car-driver) is stationery trying to turn right. even if you indicate a long way back your intentions. If a car-driver dares to say anything they get two-fingers a few choice swear words and threats of violence. It is worse now as the cars have to negotiate parked vehicles along the red route parking bays and beyond on certain days. (Even on the pavement)! I suppose it could be worse if I lived in Box Hill Since the Olympics every day and especially at weekends hoards of cyclists descend on the area, sometimes in groups of 10 or more, most of them trying to emulate Bradley Wiggins and Mark Cavendish! It is a nightmare for residents.[/p][/quote]Heaven forbid someone should enjoy being out on the road in anything other than a car........ here we go again, let me save you the bother, they dont pay road tax, they are all lycra louts, they jump red lights, they ride on the pavement, they are rude, they shout naughty words at you, you cant overtake, they should take a test, get insurance blah blah blah get over it....... CyclistsPayTaxToo

11:12pm Mon 25 Nov 13

Twickenham Bob says...

Whitton High Street is a nightmare now - lots of cars ignoring the signalised crossings and Zebra crossings. You could fine hundreds of drivers a day along this stretch as law & order has broken down
Whitton High Street is a nightmare now - lots of cars ignoring the signalised crossings and Zebra crossings. You could fine hundreds of drivers a day along this stretch as law & order has broken down Twickenham Bob

9:06am Tue 26 Nov 13

jeremyhm says...

I assume all these "black spots" have been reported by the commentators to the local police?
I assume all these "black spots" have been reported by the commentators to the local police? jeremyhm

9:36am Tue 26 Nov 13

Beverly RA says...

It would seem that every junction is a hazard from the comments above .
But I would rather be in a car than on a bike.
I drive home and its dark yet time and time again I see bikes with no lights bikers in dark clothing. It only takes a little thought, please think bikers
It would seem that every junction is a hazard from the comments above . But I would rather be in a car than on a bike. I drive home and its dark yet time and time again I see bikes with no lights bikers in dark clothing. It only takes a little thought, please think bikers Beverly RA

10:29am Tue 26 Nov 13

SteveC1964 says...

jeremyhm wrote:
I assume all these "black spots" have been reported by the commentators to the local police?
Well, you assume wrongly. The police have all the 'intelligence' they need to know where collisions happen. I wonder if they're using it? Sadly my experience of talking to the police is that you get a roll of the eyes and an explanation of either (1) it's not their job to enforce traffic offences any longer - "Go talk to Kingston Council" or (2) We're busy with other priorities at the moment.
[quote][p][bold]jeremyhm[/bold] wrote: I assume all these "black spots" have been reported by the commentators to the local police?[/p][/quote]Well, you assume wrongly. The police have all the 'intelligence' they need to know where collisions happen. I wonder if they're using it? Sadly my experience of talking to the police is that you get a roll of the eyes and an explanation of either (1) it's not their job to enforce traffic offences any longer - "Go talk to Kingston Council" or (2) We're busy with other priorities at the moment. SteveC1964

10:35am Tue 26 Nov 13

SteveC1964 says...

Beverly RA wrote:
It would seem that every junction is a hazard from the comments above .
But I would rather be in a car than on a bike.
I drive home and its dark yet time and time again I see bikes with no lights bikers in dark clothing. It only takes a little thought, please think bikers
Why do I see so many drivers in the dark without their headlights switched on? Where are their heads? And so very many with only one headlight working. At the junction of London Road and Queen Elizabeth Road I stood in front of a car stopped at the traffic lights and asked a woman why the headlights we'ren't on. She told me that they didn't work - so she "didn't haven any choice". And there are so many breaking the speed limit - in a 20 mph limit with one of those speed indicators it's only about 1 in 20 vehicles (if that) that get the smiley face for keeping within the limit. Drivers are so irresponsible.
[quote][p][bold]Beverly RA[/bold] wrote: It would seem that every junction is a hazard from the comments above . But I would rather be in a car than on a bike. I drive home and its dark yet time and time again I see bikes with no lights bikers in dark clothing. It only takes a little thought, please think bikers[/p][/quote]Why do I see so many drivers in the dark without their headlights switched on? Where are their heads? And so very many with only one headlight working. At the junction of London Road and Queen Elizabeth Road I stood in front of a car stopped at the traffic lights and asked a woman why the headlights we'ren't on. She told me that they didn't work - so she "didn't haven any choice". And there are so many breaking the speed limit - in a 20 mph limit with one of those speed indicators it's only about 1 in 20 vehicles (if that) that get the smiley face for keeping within the limit. Drivers are so irresponsible. SteveC1964

12:53pm Tue 26 Nov 13

kingstonpaul says...

I think I'm one of those people who are quite clearly an endangered species. I am a car user, and, wait for it, I also cycle. Oh, and I'm a pedestrian as well. So for me, none of this divisive tribal crap that pits car drivers vs cyclists.
However, sometimes it falls on me to advise one group or other about how they can look after themselves, and other road users, better. My prority advice is for cyclists, and these really will aid your self-preservation. (1) For God sake use lights, even better still, lights that are bright enough to be seen. (2) Please try and avoid dark clothing, especially if you've got no lights. (3) Don't wear headphones because being able to hear what is going on around you on the road is one hell of an asset.
I think I'm one of those people who are quite clearly an endangered species. I am a car user, and, wait for it, I also cycle. Oh, and I'm a pedestrian as well. So for me, none of this divisive tribal crap that pits car drivers vs cyclists. However, sometimes it falls on me to advise one group or other about how they can look after themselves, and other road users, better. My prority advice is for cyclists, and these really will aid your self-preservation. (1) For God sake use lights, even better still, lights that are bright enough to be seen. (2) Please try and avoid dark clothing, especially if you've got no lights. (3) Don't wear headphones because being able to hear what is going on around you on the road is one hell of an asset. kingstonpaul

2:08pm Tue 26 Nov 13

SteveC1964 says...

Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries.

My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike.
Steve,
a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian.
Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries. My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike. Steve, a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian. SteveC1964

3:46pm Tue 26 Nov 13

jeremyhm says...

Steve - you shouldn't let the police abrogate their responsibilities. When you get the sort of response you have reported, I suggest you take the number of the officer you have spoken to, and write a formal letter of complaint to the District Commander, who will be a Superintendent. You could also try the Council's cabinet member for transport, and cc the CEO.
Steve - you shouldn't let the police abrogate their responsibilities. When you get the sort of response you have reported, I suggest you take the number of the officer you have spoken to, and write a formal letter of complaint to the District Commander, who will be a Superintendent. You could also try the Council's cabinet member for transport, and cc the CEO. jeremyhm

8:43am Wed 27 Nov 13

CyclistsPayTaxToo says...

SteveC1964 wrote:
Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries.

My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike.
Steve,
a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian.
Realistically, the majority of London does not have the space to build segregated facilities nor the money to fund such a venture if it did. Balancing road capacity is difficult, and re-allocating space to cyclists reduces capacity for other road users which causes delays and congestion which are also a hazard. In an ideal world we could build 3m wide segregated cycle lanes and phase traffic signals so cyclists never came into contact with other vehicles - but London would come to a standstill.

Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering.
[quote][p][bold]SteveC1964[/bold] wrote: Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries. My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike. Steve, a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian.[/p][/quote]Realistically, the majority of London does not have the space to build segregated facilities nor the money to fund such a venture if it did. Balancing road capacity is difficult, and re-allocating space to cyclists reduces capacity for other road users which causes delays and congestion which are also a hazard. In an ideal world we could build 3m wide segregated cycle lanes and phase traffic signals so cyclists never came into contact with other vehicles - but London would come to a standstill. Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering. CyclistsPayTaxToo

12:16pm Wed 27 Nov 13

SteveC1964 says...

CyclistsPayTaxToo wrote:
SteveC1964 wrote:
Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries.

My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike.
Steve,
a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian.
Realistically, the majority of London does not have the space to build segregated facilities nor the money to fund such a venture if it did. Balancing road capacity is difficult, and re-allocating space to cyclists reduces capacity for other road users which causes delays and congestion which are also a hazard. In an ideal world we could build 3m wide segregated cycle lanes and phase traffic signals so cyclists never came into contact with other vehicles - but London would come to a standstill.

Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering.
"Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering."
Then you'll also know that Kingston is odds-on to get a big wedge of the £100 million 'Mini-Holland' funding that could be spent on providing segregated cycle tracks and that by getting more people to cycle will reduce the number of motor vehicles and reduce crowding on buses while encouraging active travel. And you'll know that no cycle route is safer than one that is segregated from motor traffic.
[quote][p][bold]CyclistsPayTaxToo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]SteveC1964[/bold] wrote: Given that there's no evidence that the latest spate of people on bikes being killed has anything to do with bike lights or absence thereof, my priority advice for cyclists is to assume that no lorry driver will ever see you and therefore you should keep well away from all lorries. My priority advice to TfL and other authorities is to provide segregated (i.e. with a kerb) on all main roads and control the junctions so that lorries never get to turn left across the path of a person on a bike. Steve, a bicycle rider, car driver, train traveller, pedestrian.[/p][/quote]Realistically, the majority of London does not have the space to build segregated facilities nor the money to fund such a venture if it did. Balancing road capacity is difficult, and re-allocating space to cyclists reduces capacity for other road users which causes delays and congestion which are also a hazard. In an ideal world we could build 3m wide segregated cycle lanes and phase traffic signals so cyclists never came into contact with other vehicles - but London would come to a standstill. Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering.[/p][/quote]"Unsurprisingly I am a cyclist, a driver and a pedestrian but also have the benefit of specialising in Road Safety and Road Safety Engineering." Then you'll also know that Kingston is odds-on to get a big wedge of the £100 million 'Mini-Holland' funding that could be spent on providing segregated cycle tracks and that by getting more people to cycle will reduce the number of motor vehicles and reduce crowding on buses while encouraging active travel. And you'll know that no cycle route is safer than one that is segregated from motor traffic. SteveC1964

12:57pm Wed 27 Nov 13

kingstonpaul says...

Further to my comment yesterday, yesterday evening I encountered a young cyclist on London Road carrying two bags of shopping on his handlebars, without lights and...wearing headphones. He was trying to change lanes, or shall I say was wobbling between lanes because (a) he couldn't signal as it would involve removing his hands from the handlebars which he needed to stabilise the bike due to the weight of the shopping; (b) he couldn't look round for the same reason; and (c) he sure as hell couldn't hear what was going around him. I was annoyed at this because, having a son of a similar age, I genuinely want that young man to live to a ripe old age. But his idiocy was breathtaking.
Further to my comment yesterday, yesterday evening I encountered a young cyclist on London Road carrying two bags of shopping on his handlebars, without lights and...wearing headphones. He was trying to change lanes, or shall I say was wobbling between lanes because (a) he couldn't signal as it would involve removing his hands from the handlebars which he needed to stabilise the bike due to the weight of the shopping; (b) he couldn't look round for the same reason; and (c) he sure as hell couldn't hear what was going around him. I was annoyed at this because, having a son of a similar age, I genuinely want that young man to live to a ripe old age. But his idiocy was breathtaking. kingstonpaul

8:40am Thu 28 Nov 13

CyclistsPayTaxToo says...

"Then you'll also know that Kingston is odds-on to get a big wedge of the £100 million 'Mini-Holland' funding that could be spent on providing segregated cycle tracks and that by getting more people to cycle will reduce the number of motor vehicles and reduce crowding on buses while encouraging active travel."

A drop in the ocean for what would be required to roll it out "along every major route in London" as you state and the modal shift required to reduce the volume of traffic to be relevent would never happen. Then factor in surpressed demand (those that dont drive or take a different route to avoid congestion) - its not that simple, I wish it were.

"And you'll know that no cycle route is safer than one that is segregated from motor traffic".

Hmm, not so sure. They fall down at side roads (particularly left turns) where cyclists legitimately cycle up the inside of vehicles unexpectedly and at speed that then have to cross their path in a nice lane into the side of an HGV.

They do nothing to reduce the blind spot of HGV's when turning left at junctions and side roads, the speed differential for cyclists in congestion is higher in a dedicated lane, unless they are 2.5m or greater then cyclists dont like to overtake each other in them so use the traffic lane instead, they are notoriously diificult to build, expensive, reduce kerbside facilities for buses, loading and parking, reduce general capacity but apart from that...... segregation is not the answer in isolation.

Critically segregation does nothing to resolve the conflict points at junctions where it is needed most - without seperate traffic signal phasing for cyclists then the most common dangers still exist. And I stand by my point that the provision of pre-signals or 'early starts' throughout London for cyclists would bring London to a standstill.
"Then you'll also know that Kingston is odds-on to get a big wedge of the £100 million 'Mini-Holland' funding that could be spent on providing segregated cycle tracks and that by getting more people to cycle will reduce the number of motor vehicles and reduce crowding on buses while encouraging active travel." A drop in the ocean for what would be required to roll it out "along every major route in London" as you state and the modal shift required to reduce the volume of traffic to be relevent would never happen. Then factor in surpressed demand (those that dont drive or take a different route to avoid congestion) - its not that simple, I wish it were. "And you'll know that no cycle route is safer than one that is segregated from motor traffic". Hmm, not so sure. They fall down at side roads (particularly left turns) where cyclists legitimately cycle up the inside of vehicles unexpectedly and at speed that then have to cross their path in a nice lane into the side of an HGV. They do nothing to reduce the blind spot of HGV's when turning left at junctions and side roads, the speed differential for cyclists in congestion is higher in a dedicated lane, unless they are 2.5m or greater then cyclists dont like to overtake each other in them so use the traffic lane instead, they are notoriously diificult to build, expensive, reduce kerbside facilities for buses, loading and parking, reduce general capacity but apart from that...... segregation is not the answer in isolation. Critically segregation does nothing to resolve the conflict points at junctions where it is needed most - without seperate traffic signal phasing for cyclists then the most common dangers still exist. And I stand by my point that the provision of pre-signals or 'early starts' throughout London for cyclists would bring London to a standstill. CyclistsPayTaxToo

4:42pm Thu 28 Nov 13

martnal says...

Pavement cyclists where Stanley Road And Shacklegate Lane meet in Fulwell, too impatient to wait at the lights.
Pavement cyclists where Stanley Road And Shacklegate Lane meet in Fulwell, too impatient to wait at the lights. martnal

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