Ambulance crashes into Southfields insurance company's office in Merton Road

Wandsworth Guardian: The ambulance plowed through the front of the business The ambulance plowed through the front of the business

This is the dramatic moment an ambulance crashed into the front of an insurance agents’ office in Southfields.

The ambulance, which was on its way to a serious incident, smashed through the front of Rose Insurance, in Merton Road, Southfields, at just after 5pm yesterday.

The ambulance ploughed through the frontage after colliding with another car.

Wandsworth Guardian:

Just minutes before the ambulance crashed into the office the owner, David Rose, and manager, Steve Terry, had been sat at their desks where the vehicle landed. Fortunately both escaped uninjured.

Merton Road was closed to traffic for four hours while the corner of the building was made safe.

A similar, but smaller, incident happened two years ago when a paramedic car hit the building.

"It probably would have decapitated me."

Mr Terry, 53, from Southfields, said: “We have double desks, Dave and myself, and his was nearer the window and I’m next to him.

Wandsworth Guardian:

Lucky: David Rose and Steve Terry stand in the crash area 

“I just wondered what the noise was. When I heard the crash I just thought it had hit a car but it just carried on going and stopping when it got to the end.

“The car ended up where his seat was. It probably would have decapitated me as it flew across the room.

“It could have been a whole lot worse. Luckily nobody was hurt.

"My daughter works down in Wimbledon Park and her mate went past on the bus and told her a car had gone through her dad’s office.

"She was quite worried and came down in her car. She was relieved to find I was OK.”

Paramedic did not need medic

A spokeswoman for the London Ambulance Service said: “We can confirm one of our cars was involved in a road traffic collision at around 5pm, with another car near Merton Road, SW18. This car was on its way to a serious incident nearby.

Wandsworth Guardian:

The office is now boarded up 

“We sent a single responder, two duty officers, an advanced paramedic and an ambulance crew to the scene.

“We treated one patient for minor injuries and took her to St George's Hospital – but not as a priority.

“The medic, although shaken up, did not need to go to hospital.”

Did you see what happened? Send your photos to ssleigh@london.newsquest.co.uk 

Wandsworth Guardian:

Mr Rose and Mr Terry set up their new working area 

Comments (4)

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11:17am Tue 8 Jul 14

alphabeti says...

So that's an ambulance through an office window. A bus crashed into the side of Putney Bridge. A few weeks ago an out of control car crashed into a pub in St Johns Hill. Luckily no major injuries but there have been many others killed or maimed on our roads who weren't so lucky.

We all know the road itself is a dangerous place to be but the pavement is supposed to be a safe haven. The penalties for losing control of motor vehicles should be tougher given the potential consequences. What would be the sentence for discharging a shotgun through an office window or into the side of a pub?
So that's an ambulance through an office window. A bus crashed into the side of Putney Bridge. A few weeks ago an out of control car crashed into a pub in St Johns Hill. Luckily no major injuries but there have been many others killed or maimed on our roads who weren't so lucky. We all know the road itself is a dangerous place to be but the pavement is supposed to be a safe haven. The penalties for losing control of motor vehicles should be tougher given the potential consequences. What would be the sentence for discharging a shotgun through an office window or into the side of a pub? alphabeti
  • Score: -1

12:09pm Tue 8 Jul 14

buggsie says...

Aren't councils ever going to get the message.
With this non stop building of new homes in our borough there will be more traffic.
Isn't it time our roads were widened to accommodate all the lorries, large mini cabs and public transport that are now on our roads.
Aren't councils ever going to get the message. With this non stop building of new homes in our borough there will be more traffic. Isn't it time our roads were widened to accommodate all the lorries, large mini cabs and public transport that are now on our roads. buggsie
  • Score: 1

10:11pm Tue 8 Jul 14

alroutemaster says...

Given the quality of driving I see, especially from ambulance vehicles, this does not really surprise me. The police have advanced driving tests for fast response drivers, do the LAS?
Given the quality of driving I see, especially from ambulance vehicles, this does not really surprise me. The police have advanced driving tests for fast response drivers, do the LAS? alroutemaster
  • Score: 0

9:30am Wed 9 Jul 14

CharleneBlake says...

Toyota and Lexus are #1 in cases of sudden unintended acceleration and FORD is #2. The current unintended acceleration plaguing newer vehicles is the electronically-induc
ed type. The engine throttle control systems depend on computer software to command them. Sometimes glitches occur...like in some of your other electronic devices...which can cause the command to be different than what you desire. The evidence of the glitch is often undetectable after the vehicle is restarted. Unfortunately, the EDR (black box) is not always accurate as shown by expert Dr. Antony Anderson in his analysis of a 2012 Toyota Highlander. The EDR results indicated the driver was not braking when she was doing so. The EDR results are inconsistent.

The key to avoiding a horrific crash during a SUA event is whether or not the vehicle has an effective fail-safe in the event a glitch occurs. If it does not, as in the case of the glitch-prone Toyota ETCS-i, then the vehicle may become a runaway with an ineffective means to stop it. Unfortunately, the safety standards aren't as strict in automobiles as they are in airplanes. Some manufacturers have more effective fail-safes than others. In the case of Toyota, an embedded software expert, Michael Barr (see Oklahoma Bookout vs. Toyota court case involving a 2005 Camry) found that an electronic glitch could induce a SUA event. Another expert, Dr. Henning Leidecker, found that a SUA event could also be triggered by "tin whisker" formation, particularly in 2002-2006 Toyota Camry vehicles.

SUA events have been DEADLY for vehicle occupants as well as pedestrians and people in storefronts, buildings, and even homes. The numbers of such crashes are ever-increasing with the advent of the very complex ELECTRONIC throttle control systems.

With the increase in such serious vehicle crashes, there is a concerted effort to show driver "pedal misapplication" or a "medical condition" or some other reason for the incident...anything other than a vehicle defect. Investigators aren't scrutinizing the buggy electronic throttle control software or other conditions that can elicit a terrifying sudden unintended acceleration incident. They usually just examine the *mechanical* causes which tend to be just red herrings in these cases. Investigators simply don't have the expertise to find such electronic glitches. In fact, the staff at the NHTSA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, do not have this very specialized training!

Think of it...the next step in electronically-contr
olled vehicles seems to be so-called "self-driving cars." Do YOU want to be in a such a vehicle when there is no evidence that strict safety standards, particularly in the throttle control system's software, have been adhered to? Will you just BLINDLY trust the automaker (criminally-investig
ated and nearly-prosecuted Toyota and soon-to-be GM and others?) to come through for you and your family's safety *on its own*?

A recently published Huffington Post article by Jonathan Handel,
How Do We Know Driverless Cars Are Safe? Google Says 'Trust Us'
Posted: 07/01/2014 7:23 pm EDT Updated: 07/02/2014 1:48 pm EDT speaks to these very issues and poses tough questions about Google's "driverless" vehicles. Educate yourself carefully before you put your faith in automakers who have knowingly lied to their customers and the government for decades. Study the issue of vehicle electronic sudden unintended acceleration and ask WHY we aren't seeing it addressed publicly.

WHY is blame placed on the driver with little more than speculation about which pedal was used or with little more than an assumption on medical condition. This is being done *even when the drivers steadfastly cite a VEHICLE PROBLEM as the cause of the crash.

Absence of proof is not proof of absence of a serious ELECTRONIC computer glitch or other electronically-cause
d SUA.
Toyota and Lexus are #1 in cases of sudden unintended acceleration and FORD is #2. The current unintended acceleration plaguing newer vehicles is the electronically-induc ed type. The engine throttle control systems depend on computer software to command them. Sometimes glitches occur...like in some of your other electronic devices...which can cause the command to be different than what you desire. The evidence of the glitch is often undetectable after the vehicle is restarted. Unfortunately, the EDR (black box) is not always accurate as shown by expert Dr. Antony Anderson in his analysis of a 2012 Toyota Highlander. The EDR results indicated the driver was not braking when she was doing so. The EDR results are inconsistent. The key to avoiding a horrific crash during a SUA event is whether or not the vehicle has an effective fail-safe in the event a glitch occurs. If it does not, as in the case of the glitch-prone Toyota ETCS-i, then the vehicle may become a runaway with an ineffective means to stop it. Unfortunately, the safety standards aren't as strict in automobiles as they are in airplanes. Some manufacturers have more effective fail-safes than others. In the case of Toyota, an embedded software expert, Michael Barr (see Oklahoma Bookout vs. Toyota court case involving a 2005 Camry) found that an electronic glitch could induce a SUA event. Another expert, Dr. Henning Leidecker, found that a SUA event could also be triggered by "tin whisker" formation, particularly in 2002-2006 Toyota Camry vehicles. SUA events have been DEADLY for vehicle occupants as well as pedestrians and people in storefronts, buildings, and even homes. The numbers of such crashes are ever-increasing with the advent of the very complex ELECTRONIC throttle control systems. With the increase in such serious vehicle crashes, there is a concerted effort to show driver "pedal misapplication" or a "medical condition" or some other reason for the incident...anything other than a vehicle defect. Investigators aren't scrutinizing the buggy electronic throttle control software or other conditions that can elicit a terrifying sudden unintended acceleration incident. They usually just examine the *mechanical* causes which tend to be just red herrings in these cases. Investigators simply don't have the expertise to find such electronic glitches. In fact, the staff at the NHTSA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, do not have this very specialized training! Think of it...the next step in electronically-contr olled vehicles seems to be so-called "self-driving cars." Do YOU want to be in a such a vehicle when there is no evidence that strict safety standards, particularly in the throttle control system's software, have been adhered to? Will you just BLINDLY trust the automaker (criminally-investig ated and nearly-prosecuted Toyota and soon-to-be GM and others?) to come through for you and your family's safety *on its own*? A recently published Huffington Post article by Jonathan Handel, How Do We Know Driverless Cars Are Safe? Google Says 'Trust Us' Posted: 07/01/2014 7:23 pm EDT Updated: 07/02/2014 1:48 pm EDT speaks to these very issues and poses tough questions about Google's "driverless" vehicles. Educate yourself carefully before you put your faith in automakers who have knowingly lied to their customers and the government for decades. Study the issue of vehicle electronic sudden unintended acceleration and ask WHY we aren't seeing it addressed publicly. WHY is blame placed on the driver with little more than speculation about which pedal was used or with little more than an assumption on medical condition. This is being done *even when the drivers steadfastly cite a VEHICLE PROBLEM as the cause of the crash. Absence of proof is not proof of absence of a serious ELECTRONIC computer glitch or other electronically-cause d SUA. CharleneBlake
  • Score: -3
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