London councils urge government to crack down on dangerous dogs

Wandsworth Guardian: Councils urge crackdown on dangerous dogs Councils urge crackdown on dangerous dogs

The government is being urged to bring forward plans to help local authorities crack down on dangerous dogs.

London councils are calling for action as the problem with 'status dogs' used by gangs as weapons is growing.

In 2006 the number of dogs seized by the Metropolitan Police stood at 193, in 2010 the figure rose to 1,107. The number of dogs destroyed went up from 27 to 563 during the same period.

Now London Councils, which represents the capital's 33 authorities, is pressing the government to bring forward promised proposals for possible changes to the law.

Local authorities have the power to seize dogs they consider to be dangerously out of control and work with the police and animal charities to enforce the law and promote responsible dog ownership.

London Councils is calling on the government to increase the penalty for owning a banned type dog to bring it more in line with carrying an offensive weapon.

They are also calling for enforcement to made cheaper and quicker and for the law to be extended to include private land to protect those who have to visit other people's homes as part of their work.

Councillor Claire Kober, London Councils' executive member for crime and public protections aid: "Community safety is a top priority for London's councils.

"People need to be reassured that local authorities have the powers and resources to deal with dangerous dogs.

"People were sickened by the recent dog attack on policemen in east London and they are worried about dangerous, uncontrolled dogs and thugs using 'status dogs' as weapons.

"I urge ministers to publish plans as soon as possible and work with us to make sure we have effective measures to tackle this menace."

Comments (8)

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9:37am Sat 7 Apr 12

emelem says...

a crackdown should be on the idiots who gain possession of the dogs, not the dogs themselves! so annoying that this fact keeps getting ignored.

people who use dogs as weapons have no interest in learning about responsible dog ownership, these learning events are only preaching to the choir!

idiot dog owners should be made to spend a night, a week, a month (or however long it takes to get through their thicko skulls) on the cold, concrete floor of a dog rescue kennel (not human prison, they're too pampered there).

let them listen to the echoing barks for attention *all day long* and the whimpering cries of loneliness and sadness *all night long*. if that doesn't make a person more caring and responsible, i don't know what will.
a crackdown should be on the idiots who gain possession of the dogs, not the dogs themselves! so annoying that this fact keeps getting ignored. people who use dogs as weapons have no interest in learning about responsible dog ownership, these learning events are only preaching to the choir! idiot dog owners should be made to spend a night, a week, a month (or however long it takes to get through their thicko skulls) on the cold, concrete floor of a dog rescue kennel (not human prison, they're too pampered there). let them listen to the echoing barks for attention *all day long* and the whimpering cries of loneliness and sadness *all night long*. if that doesn't make a person more caring and responsible, i don't know what will. emelem
  • Score: 0

10:35am Sat 7 Apr 12

EverardEdbutt says...

"They are also calling for enforcement to made cheaper and quicker and for the law to be extended to include private land to protect those who have to visit other people's homes as part of their work."

As long as it cant be used by someone who has burgled your house and subsequently gets bitten by your dog.

I am all for reforms to the useless Dangerous Dogs Act legislation.
But I fear this will again be a kneejerk reaction just as The Dangerous Dog's Act was and will be ill prepared to deal with the problem.

Don't punish the breed punish the deed!
Vilifying a particular breed does nothing to curb the problem but may infact make things worse, a dog gets labelled a vicious breed then people who see intimidation as desirable get that breed to instil fear in others.
Its caveman stuff, My club is bigger then yours etc.

Just how effective has the DDA been?
It has been a complete failure (Or in political speak a partial success as the breeds named in the act are no longer responsible for dog attacks) but what has it achieved, really?
Nothing, we still have a problem with so called status dogs. Youths/Teenagers parade their bastardised bull breeds round our streets and our parks, training the dogs to bite and hold by using the rubber swing seats. (Next time you walk through a park look at the swings and you will see most off them have been chewed to the point of being useless)
We have to change the rules on ownership, it really is that simple. Make it illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to be in possession of a dog.
All dog owners should have to take out pet insurance with a hefty public liability.
A condition of ownership would mean taking part in Government approved Basic Dog Training.

Make microchipping compulsory. No microchip and your dog is taken, simple.
These would be easily enforced, any police officer or council warden would be able to scan your dog with the handheld microchip readers.
We can police untaxed, uninsured drivers so it is not inconceivable to have a similar system in place for dogs.

The root cause of the problem, however is to be found at the other end of the lead and it is there the real blame should lie, with the 2 legged animal not the furry 4 legged one who only lives to please his owner.
I own an American Bulldog for the record, and fully understand her requirements and have trained her well. My dog is an extension of my family and should be viewed as such, not like the many youths who see their dogs as a weapon they cant get nicked for.

I urge you to watch this BBC programme: My weapon is my Dog, then you will see just who is to blame for this problem

http://www.bbc.co.uk
/programmes/b00kmtl9
"They are also calling for enforcement to made cheaper and quicker and for the law to be extended to include private land to protect those who have to visit other people's homes as part of their work." As long as it cant be used by someone who has burgled your house and subsequently gets bitten by your dog. I am all for reforms to the useless Dangerous Dogs Act legislation. But I fear this will again be a kneejerk reaction just as The Dangerous Dog's Act was and will be ill prepared to deal with the problem. Don't punish the breed punish the deed! Vilifying a particular breed does nothing to curb the problem but may infact make things worse, a dog gets labelled a vicious breed then people who see intimidation as desirable get that breed to instil fear in others. Its caveman stuff, My club is bigger then yours etc. Just how effective has the DDA been? It has been a complete failure (Or in political speak a partial success as the breeds named in the act are no longer responsible for dog attacks) but what has it achieved, really? Nothing, we still have a problem with so called status dogs. Youths/Teenagers parade their bastardised bull breeds round our streets and our parks, training the dogs to bite and hold by using the rubber swing seats. (Next time you walk through a park look at the swings and you will see most off them have been chewed to the point of being useless) We have to change the rules on ownership, it really is that simple. Make it illegal for anyone under the age of 21 to be in possession of a dog. All dog owners should have to take out pet insurance with a hefty public liability. A condition of ownership would mean taking part in Government approved Basic Dog Training. Make microchipping compulsory. No microchip and your dog is taken, simple. These would be easily enforced, any police officer or council warden would be able to scan your dog with the handheld microchip readers. We can police untaxed, uninsured drivers so it is not inconceivable to have a similar system in place for dogs. The root cause of the problem, however is to be found at the other end of the lead and it is there the real blame should lie, with the 2 legged animal not the furry 4 legged one who only lives to please his owner. I own an American Bulldog for the record, and fully understand her requirements and have trained her well. My dog is an extension of my family and should be viewed as such, not like the many youths who see their dogs as a weapon they cant get nicked for. I urge you to watch this BBC programme: My weapon is my Dog, then you will see just who is to blame for this problem http://www.bbc.co.uk /programmes/b00kmtl9 EverardEdbutt
  • Score: 0

2:03pm Sat 7 Apr 12

tjames says...

yawn
yawn tjames
  • Score: 0

2:05pm Sat 7 Apr 12

tjames says...

how about abolishing london councils--will save us a fortune
how about abolishing london councils--will save us a fortune tjames
  • Score: 0

2:19pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Princess Ariel says...

Agree with earlier posts.
Why should the dogs be punished?
Anyone who wants to buy/own a dog should have to buy a licence and have public liability insurance. The fees would help pay for implementation and housing (humanely) confiscated dogs.
These dogs should then be fairly assessed, as to whether they can be re-homed, with responsible owners.
However, compulsory training courses should be introduced in order to obtain a license and the above mentioned insurance.
Any responsible dog owners would not have a problem with these conditions.
As the "status owners" and irresponsible people probably wouldn't comply, in a few years I believe we would see a huge decrease in dogs.
The programme would have to be nationwide, but it would work.
It would be beneficial for everyone: dogs, owners, the Police and the thousands of people who get bitten by poorly trained or managed dogs every year!
We have to remember that there are no "bad dogs". Just "bad dog owners"!
Agree with earlier posts. Why should the dogs be punished? Anyone who wants to buy/own a dog should have to buy a licence and have public liability insurance. The fees would help pay for implementation and housing (humanely) confiscated dogs. These dogs should then be fairly assessed, as to whether they can be re-homed, with responsible owners. However, compulsory training courses should be introduced in order to obtain a license and the above mentioned insurance. Any responsible dog owners would not have a problem with these conditions. As the "status owners" and irresponsible people probably wouldn't comply, in a few years I believe we would see a huge decrease in dogs. The programme would have to be nationwide, but it would work. It would be beneficial for everyone: dogs, owners, the Police and the thousands of people who get bitten by poorly trained or managed dogs every year! We have to remember that there are no "bad dogs". Just "bad dog owners"! Princess Ariel
  • Score: 0

5:18pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Michael Pantlin says...

Councils are following a few leads
Councils are following a few leads Michael Pantlin
  • Score: 0

6:34pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Krissi says...

I wish people would think before bringing in knee jerk laws and regulations- it is never really the dog's fault- it is the owner who teaches that dog how to behave- yes we need to promote responsible dog ownership but why aim this at the dogs ?
I wish people would think before bringing in knee jerk laws and regulations- it is never really the dog's fault- it is the owner who teaches that dog how to behave- yes we need to promote responsible dog ownership but why aim this at the dogs ? Krissi
  • Score: 0

7:19pm Sat 7 Apr 12

Yaffle1 says...

I agree that the problem is almost entirely with the owners. Anyone who scores 8 or more on the chav index and who can't spell Staffordshire should be disqualified from owning a dog.
I agree that the problem is almost entirely with the owners. Anyone who scores 8 or more on the chav index and who can't spell Staffordshire should be disqualified from owning a dog. Yaffle1
  • Score: 0

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