Epsom remembered its war dead with parades, a two-minute silence, wreath laying ceremonies, church services and a community walk on Sunday.

Families wearing red poppies bowed their heads and reflected on the horrors of war with MP Chris Grayling and the Mayor of Epsom at Ashley Road memorial in the morning.

More people than usual turned out for church services and wreath laying cememonies throughout the borough because it is the 100th anniversary of the Great War.

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Ashley Road memorial, Epsom

A memorial parade, including soldiers, cadets and scouts, also passed through Ewell and ended at St Mary’s in the village.

Brian Angus, chairman of the Ewell Village Residents’ Association, said the Mayor laid a wreath at the war memorial in the churchyard and reviewed troops in Church Street, Ewell.

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Soldiers march from Ewell West station. Photo: Brian Angus

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The community walk sets off from Epsom town centre

Mr Angus said: “Never have so many troops, cadets and members of uniformed organisations, taken part and so many looked on. The sun set the tone and there was cheerfulness and a sense of togetherness.”

Councillor Clive Woodbridge, who represents Ewell, said: "I think the borough as a whole did its forefathers proud in marking this event.

"Local people came out in much greater numbers than usual. It shows people recognise it is a particularly poignant and significant anniversary."

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The event in Ewell. Photo: Brian Angus 

In the afternoon community members remembered war dead by walking from Epsom’s clock tower to Epsom Cemetery. On arrival there was a remembrance service at the cemetery.

Walk organiser Paul Taylor, from community Facebook group What's on in Epsom, said as a boy he used to go out of his house to watch a band march past on its way to a memorial service there.

Mr Taylor said: "The Remembrance service stopped some years ago for one reason or another. In this the 100th Anniversary of the start of World War I and given the fact that there are over 140 service personal from around the Commonwealth who never went home, I felt this year was a good time to bring the march back.

"We had about 20 people old and young and families as well as a few scouts join us at the clock tower in brilliant sunshine. 

"The atmosphere was strange as we posed for photos did we smile or not as this was a walk of remembrance but many on the walk had memories of the old service that use to happen."

Along with the rest of the nation, people will fall silent at the clock tower in Epsom at 11am on Tuesday. Arrive at 10.45am for a service to commemorate those who have died in conflict.

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Ashley Road memorial

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Ewell. Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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Ewell. Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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Ewell. Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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Ewell: Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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Ewell. Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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Ewell. Photo: Butterflyphoto.co.uk

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For all of our World War 1 centenary coverage visit www.epsomguardian.co.uk/ww1

Dedicate a tree for £20 to someone lived or served in the First World War. Call 0800 915 1914 or go to www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/mylocalpaper

Do you have any photos of Remembrance Sunday? Please email alice.foster@london.newsquest.co.uk